Review: Project Paleo – finally! Paleo lunches in the CBD

Back in the 2013 when I first started this blog, there was no such thing as a paleo restaurant or takeaway or cafe in Singapore. You either had to cook at home to get a good paleo meal or just close an eye and brave it outside. First, Cavemen Food opened up at Novena Square Two. And now for people at Raffles Place, we have Project Paleo.

Here is the owner Joyce with her stall at 15 Phillip Street. Her food contain no refined sugar, no harmful additives, no diary and no gluten. Olive oil is used for cooking.

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All sets go for $8, which include one main and two sides. The mains range from chicken to fish to beef to pork. The sides include sweet potatoes, mushrooms and vegetables. And fear not if you are vegetarian because you can choose three sides as well.

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I chose the salmon with cauliflower rice and mushrooms. Here’s my verdict:

  • Salmon: tender but quite plain and less tasty than I expected.
  • Mushrooms: yummy! The best part of my dish.
  • Cauliflower rice: this tastes very interesting indeed – like coleslaw but a super healthy version. Some people in the paleo world eat this to simulate the mouth feel of real rice.
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Salmon, mushrooms and cauliflower rice

My overall thought was that the dish was very small. I wasn’t full after eating even though I enjoyed every delicious morsel of food. The salmon was 150 grams and for another $4 you can add on another 100 grams. Or maybe I just have a huge appetite! Continue reading Review: Project Paleo – finally! Paleo lunches in the CBD

Restaurant review: Red Pig Korean Restaurant

I found another paleo-friendly restaurant!

Red Pig is a Korean restaurant that specialises in BBQ meat. It has a similar concept to Mookata, the Thai BBQ place I reviewed recently. I think I prefer Red Pig because the meat have less sauce and feel less heavy in my tummy.

It was Alicia’s suggestion to go to Red Pig for a girl’s night out. We made a reservation for 730pm on a Thursday night because it was known to get packed really quickly.

Red Pig Singapore

All the tables came with a BBQ grill and some vacuum tube from the ceiling that sucks up the BBQ fumes. Nonetheless, be prepared for your clothes and hair to stink after Red Pig. Continue reading Restaurant review: Red Pig Korean Restaurant

Restaurant review: Mookata Tradtional Thai BBQ

I didn’t know what a Thai BBQ steamboat was until I tried Mookata Thai BBQ for the first time yesterday. In fact, yesterday was the first time I stepped into Golden Mile Complex, which is located at Beach Road. I’ve only been to Golden Mile to take the bus to Malaysia and didn’t know that it’s considered to be “Little Thailand.”

I wanted to do a review of Mookata because I think it’s a great place for paleo eating. The first thing I noticed when we sat down to eat was that lard was used to coat the grill.

thai bbq golden mile Continue reading Restaurant review: Mookata Tradtional Thai BBQ

We are made of corn

I like reading books and watching documentaries about health and our food system. The only problem is that it makes me afraid of food I buy from supermarkets. I went to Cold Storage recently and they were having a sale of “jumbo chickens.” Instead of salivating, I looked at them suspiciously. They were all the same jumbo size with the same massive breasts, looking very swollen and brown.

Jumbo roasted chicken

(They looked something like that)

These thoughts raced through my head:

  1. Why is the chicken so big? Has it been pumped full of antibiotics?
  2. Where is the chicken from? Were they caged up with no space to run around and fattened up on corn?
  3. What’s the sauce they use to coat the chicken? Is there sugar in it?
  4. Why do I need to think so much before I buy a piece of poultry?

This makes grocery shopping very stressful.

In one of the documentaries I watched recently, a scientist examines the hair shaft of two Americans to see how percentage of their carbon originated from corn. He found that more than 50% of their diet derive from corn. But this doesn’t mean that the film makers eat corn on the cob half of the time.

Rather, corn is processed, broken down into so many additives and added to so many processed food that it manages to sneak into our diets without us realising it. Some of these industrial products are:

  • High-fructose corn syrup – a sweetener used in Coke and other soft drinks
  • Dextrose – a sugar added to French fries
  • Monosodium Glutamate (MSG) – flavour enhancer used extensively in Singapore hawker centres. I have a big problem with MSG. Too much of it and I get a very bad neck and spine ache. They feel numb and start tingling at the same time. The last time this happened I ate a fish cake from a hawker centre, which turned out to contain more MSG than fish.

This is a great resource that lists the ingredients derived from corn.

To read more about the industrial food industry and the impact on our health, check out:

The documentaries are:

  • Food, Inc
  • King Corn