What people eat around the world

In 2007, photographer Peter Menzel and writer Faith D’Aluisio visited 30 families in 24 countries to document what they ate. The results were incredible photographs showing Indian, Japanese, Mexican families with their weekly meals.

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The Patkar family spends around $45 per week
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The Ukita family spends around $361 per week

I have always been curious about what other people eat. When I’m at supermarkets, I would peer into the baskets of other shoppers. Did that man just buy 10 bags of Coke and 8 bags of potato chips? And, oh wow, that salmon looks amazing – where did she get that?

In their 2010 book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets, Peter and Faith focused on the diets of individuals instead.

On one extreme, we have this lady in the UK showing us what she eats on a bingeing day. Her bags of chips, chocolate bars, bread and sausages amounted to more than 12,000 calories.

Continue reading What people eat around the world

Top 3 weird and wonderful diets

If you think the paleo diet is strange, think again. While some people cannot grasp the idea of eating healthy, whole food with minimal processed meals, other people around the world are taking their food choices to another level altogether. Here are the top 3 weird and wonderful (some might call them wacky) diets.

1. Fruitarianism

This diet, like its name suggests, is a diet consisting largely (more than 75%) of raw fruit. It is a subset of veganism and closely related to raw foodism, which we will talk about later. The other 25% of this diet usually include vegetables, nuts and seeds.

In this category, we have people from The Banana Girl (yes, that’s the name of her website and it’s very catchy, I must say) to ultra marathon runner Michael Arnstein.

First up, we have Freelee the Banana Girl, who hails from Australia. She stirred up controversy when she posted a YouTube video of herself eating 51 bananas a day.

banana girl diet

She eats no cooked food until 4pm, usually eating mono meals – which means making meals out of one type of food only – of melons, pineapples and of course, bananas. After 4pm, she then eats cooked food, which could be 3.5kg of potato baked in the oven, or another meal of fruit. Continue reading Top 3 weird and wonderful diets

Resistant starch can improve your health

Resistant starch is the new buzzword in health circles. It started with Richard Nikoley¬†unearthing research at his blog Free The Animal and the excitement surrounding resistant starch has been picked up by the paleo¬†world as a type of good starch that can be eaten even as part of a low-carbohydrate diet.¬†Resistant starch’s¬†main role is to feed the good bacteria in our gut, and subsequently, help¬†to reduce leaky gut syndrome, improve allergies and autoimmune conditions,¬†reduce colon cancer risk and¬†improve blood cholesterol. Dieters also have cause for cheer. Resistant starch can aid in weight loss by increasing satiety; it is a carbohydrate that with virtually zero impact on blood glucose.

What is resistant starch?

Essentially, resistant starch is a type of carbohydrate that cannot be digested by your body, but becomes food for your gut bacteria. Normally, starch is digested in your small intestine and absorbed by your body. The remaining non-digestible portion is called resistant starch and travels to the large intestine, where it is broken down by bacteria for energy.

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Bacteria using the resistant starch for energy in the large intestine

The subsequent by-product Рbutyrate Рis the preferred fuel of the cells that line the colon. Butyrate may reduce inflammation in the gut and other tissues and may improve our immune system and metabolism. Continue reading Resistant starch can improve your health